Chanterelle cleaning videos

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Polygonatum: Edible fruit? & an arboretum mislabeled species.

Even one of the most expensive colleges anywhere (Connecticut College) doesn’t label all their arboretum plants correctly. I found they’ve mislabeled their large Solomon’s Seal plants as P. pubescens. The plants are far too large and lacking the significant hairs of this species. I don’t know if my camera-phone’s photos are sufficient for a clear ID, though. For all I know, though in their native species section, they could have obtained seeds somewhere that sold them a non-native species. Otherwise, I’d lean toward the giant solomon’s seal.

The next point is the berries. They’re sweet, lacking insipid, acrid, bitter, or anything else that would be a problem. Going w/the idea w/plants that we can detect major poisons by taste, if not minor poisons, this isn’t passing that test. I’ve seen it in Sam Thayer’s book as "inedible". I don’t know if all species have the taste I had here, but I can say either this is the 1st clear exception on poison, or it is edible. Any comments are welcome, as I’d like to understand this better. Oh, and, I did eat one berry a little while ago, but may want more info. before eating several at once.

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Leucoagaricus americanus

Can anyone please confirm its identity prior to my cooking it?

found growing in mulch.

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Elderly Man Mushrooming

Though I’m not technically elderly, I do have a mobility problem that partially parallels. My mycorrhizal mushrooming is now mostly limited to a single birch tree. All from a single birch tree, except for the meadow mushrooms, I annually get white blushers (Amanitas) and Boletus bicolor.

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9 September, 2016 23:47

An unexpected imprinted mushroom (B. bicolor).

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Berkeley’s Polypore: Culinary Properties website

https://sites.google.com/site/berkeleyspolypore/extra-credit

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tasty (?) berries of jack in the pulpit & more on jack in the pulpit

Particularly tasty plants I’ve tasted aren’t particularly toxic. I tried tasting and spitting most of a fully ripe berry of what I think was Arum maculatum (jack in the pulpit). See attached photo. It was sweet & overall pretty tasty, though possibly fully eating it would show me off-tastes for all I know. It took a bit of time before I noticed the micro-needles that are the oxalates w/in my mouth, but they were minimal. In fact, the sensation of so few oxalates is rather interesting (like how a hot pepper can be interesting, though too much can really hurt). I wonder if the fully ripe berries lack plentiful levels of oxalates. I wonder if eating it fully would continue to taste pretty tasty. Has anyone experience tasting these?

Also, I read on wikipedia about the root: "The root of the cuckoo-pint, when roasted well, is edible and when ground was once traded under the name of Portland sago. It was used like salep (orchid flour) to make saloop — a drink popular before the introduction of tea or coffee. It was also used as a substitute for arrowroot. If prepared incorrectly, it can be highly toxic so should be prepared with due diligence and caution." I wonder how doable this really is.

(Note wikipedia also states many have gone to the hospital after eating the berries).

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